Music Overview

pkp_la_mt_picture_recognition.jpgFor children, music may be the first and most satisfying social group experience. Even very young children, or those who are handicapped, delayed, or emotionally disturbed, typically enjoy singing and dancing as part of the group. Language is not essential. The sound and rhythm are sufficient to sustain the involvement,

Music can be used to establish routine, smooth transitions, speed socialization, develop rhythm and coordination, and build skills and egos. We selected songs in this unit as examples to illustrate the ways music can be used to accomplish these purposes.

We omit objectives from these activities in favor of this list describing use of these songs. Add your own specific learning objectives for different situations.

1. Songs for transitions, settling down, and focusing attention:
Shakin’ Around
Let Everybody Clap Hands Like Me
Everybody Sit Down

2. Songs which encourage group spirit:
Rock-a My Soul
Love Somebody
Zum Gali Gali

3. Songs which foster rhythm and coordination:
Who Stole the Cookies?
Boa Constrictor
Shimmy Coke-a-Pop
Dulce Dulce
Ay Cumma Zimba

4. Songs that teach concepts and might be part of a curriculum unit:
Carrot Seed Song
Boa Constrictor
Ten Little Monkeys
Counting Stars
One Elephant
Wheels on the Bus
Old MacDonald

5. Songs to include in a class songbook:
Ten Little Monkeys
The Horsey and the Flea
Little Cabin in the Woods
One Elephant
Variation on Ten Little Monkeys

6. Songs which give individual children a turn in the spotlight:
Spinning Song
Where is_____?
Rover
Who Stole the Cookies?

7. Songs to dramatize:
Ten Little Monkeys
One Elephant
Wheels on the Bus
Little Cabin in the Woods
Old MacDonald

8. Making Instruments-in this section we also include several activites for making instruments for children. Be sure kids get to try out their instruments right away in rhythm activities:
Bottle Cap Clackers
Nail Xylophone
Making Twirl Drums
Cup Shakers
Sand-Block Instruments

Some Suggestions:

1. Try out some new songs at staff meetings and exchange ideas on ways to adapt, expand, and develop variations